connecting two computers with ethernet hub

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connecting two computers with ethernet hub

Postby dmehling » 2014-06-19 23:52

I am not yet a user of uvnc, and so I have a question I need answered before I go to the trouble of installing it. If I have two computers connected to each other with an ethernet hub, can I initiate a remote session without a router?
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Re: connecting two computers with ethernet hub

Postby Rudi De Vos » 2014-06-21 21:09

Yes,
Vnc like any other network software use ip addresses. If adress A can connect to address B
it's ok, it's independed of the hardware you use.

If you connect 2 PC you can use a cross cable, a hub a switch...
A router is something you use to connect to different networks
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Re: connecting two computers with ethernet hub

Postby dmehling » 2014-08-09 00:11

If I am using a network switch in addition to a router, do I need to set up port forwarding on my router? There are times when I disconnect my network switch from the router, so that my two computers are connected to each other only through the network switch. Surely I wouldn't need port forwarding in that case, would I?
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Re: connecting two computers with ethernet hub

Postby dmehling » 2014-08-10 18:17

Does anyone have an answer for this?
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Re: connecting two computers with ethernet hub

Postby Bonji » 2014-08-14 18:21

Wow, I hate the back button in a text field on a web page when it takes you to the previous page instead of deleting a character............ TAKE 2:


You really need to understand the basics of networking if you want to use it as a solution medium. To that end, I'll try to provide a basic overview of how it works.

In order for two computers to communicate with each other over the TCP/IP protocol, there are some requirements:

1) Physical connectivity
a) They can be connected to each directly via an Ethernet cable (non-gigabit speeds require a crossover cable)
b) They can both be connected to the same hub
*Note: A wireless Access Point is basically a hub that uses radio waves instead of wires
c) They can both be connected to the same switch
*Note: A switch is a hub that increases available bandwidth by eliminating collisions through a MAC address table

2) Logical connectivity
a) Each computer needs an IP address that is on the same network segment as the other
b) If the computers have IP addresses that are on different network segments, then a router must be between them that can route the packets between the two disparate networks. The router effectively joins the two different network segments together (with some consequences that are not relevant to this discussion). A firewall is basically a router that enforces what types of traffic are allowed to flow between the two networks and to what devices on each end. Port-forwarding on a router is just a rule that maps an inside address/port to an outside address/port so it can be accessed directly. Typically the firewall hides all devices on the inside so this is how you "publish" those inside devices to the outside (typically internet-facing).

Once you solve the requirements of #1 and #2, the two computers should be able to 'talk' to each other barring firewalls they run themselves.


Here's another explanation using the Postal Service as an analogy:

** Example 1 ** (Direct connection, hub, or switch)
Aaron (CompA) wants to send a letter (data packet) to Barry (CompB)

Aaron has a street address of 213 Remington Lane (IP 10.0.0.213)
Barry has a street address of 216 Remington Lane (IP 10.0.0.216)

Aaron can send his letter directly without any assistance because their addresses are on the same street

** Example 2 ** (Router)
Aaron (CompA) wants to send a letter (data packet) to Charles (CompC)

Aaron has a street address of 213 Remington Lane (IP 10.0.0.213)
Charles has a street address of 91 Posey Street (IP 10.100.100.91)

Aaron cannot send his letter to Charles directly because they do not live on the same street. Instead Aaron sends his letter to the Post Office (router) which in turn knows where Posey Street is (10.100.100.xxx) so it then sets up delivery to his address as soon as possible.

** Example 3 ** (Firewall)
Aaron (CompA) wants to send a letter (data packet) to David (CompD)

Aaron has a street address of 213 Remington Lane (IP 10.0.0.213)
David has a street address of 102 Endless Road (IP 172.16.1.102)

Aaron cannot send his letter to David directly because they do not live on the same street. Instead Aaron sends his letter to the Post Office (firewall) which in turn knows where Endless Street is (172.16.1.xxx) so it then sets up delivery to his address as soon as possible. However, David instituted a Hold Mail (firewall rule) for his address so the Post Office stops delivery because it was instructed to not deliver mail to 102 Endless Road.

** Example 4 ** (Router + firewall on client computer)
Aaron (CompA) wants to send a letter (data packet) to Eugene (CompE)

Aaron has a street address of 213 Remington Lane (IP 10.0.0.213)
Eugene has a street address of 241 Covington Way (IP 172.16.30.241)

Aaron cannot send his letter to Eugene directly because they do not live on the same street. Instead Aaron sends his letter to the Post Office (firewall) which in turn knows where Covington Way is (172.16.30.xxx) so it then sets up delivery to his address as soon as possible. Once the letter is delivered to Eugene's house, Eugene tears it up and throws it away without reading it because he does not accept letters from anyone on Remington Lane (client firewall rule).


These are simplistic examples, but I think they do cover the basics via more common vernacular.
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